Practical TRANSISTOR Servicing (1967) -- Contents and Intro

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Contents

SECTION 1 UNDERSTANDING THE TRANSISTOR

Basic Transistor Function-Identifying the Transistor Elements-Transistor Types

SECTION 2 CIRCUIT COMPONENTS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS

Basic Circuit Limitations-Eliminating the Bias Battery-The Input and Output Transformers-A Typical Amplifier Stage- Feedback for Oscillators

SECTION 3 LEARNING TO TROUBLESHOOT AM TRANSISTOR RADIOS

Schematic Familiarization-Checking the Power Supply-Stage Isolation Methods

SECTION 4 LEARNING TO TROUBLESHOOT AM-FM TRANSISTOR RADIOS

Schematic Familiarization-Isolating Troubles

SECTION 5 NORMAL TRANSISTOR VOLTAGES

Comparison of Tube and Transistor Elements-NPN Transistors-PNP Transistors-Summary

SECTION 6 DEFECTIVE VOLTAGES AND THEIR MEANINGS

Causes of Voltage Errors-Sample Defects in Actual Circuits

SECTION 7 TESTING TRANSISTORS

DC Tests-Testing Transistors with an Ohmmeter-In-Circuit Tests-Out-of-Circuit Tests-Checking Transistor Gain-Identifying Transistor Types-Special Tests for Power Transistors

SECTION 8 TROUBLESHOOTING AM AUTOMOBILE RADIOS

Schematic Familiarization-Tracking Down the Troubles Troubleshooting Summary

SECTION 9 TROUBLESHOOTING AM-FM AUTOMOBILE RADIOS

Schematic Familiarization - Troubleshooting the Radio - Aligning AM-FM Radios

SECTION 10 CASE HISTORIES OF ACTUAL TROUBLES

The Dead Portable-The Dropped Radio-Intermittent and Weak Output-The High-Drain Portable-Case of the Unusual Short-AM-FM With No AM-The Fader Fixed Fast


This guide is based on the 1967 Sams book:

Preface

Most of you undoubtedly have experienced the wonderful sensation of having the entire concept of a complex subject suddenly become clear and meaningful ... or, as they say, "comes the dawn." Many magazine articles and books have been published about transistors and transistor-circuit servicing. Yet, from the hundreds of questions asked mhz at technical lectures and service meetings, I could see that a truly down-to-earth, practical presentation of the subject was sorely needed. It was with this thought in mind that this guide was prepared.

There are two subjects of interest to almost everyone making money, and enjoying the work he must do for it. Those in electronics servicing will not find it difficult to do both, provided they have an open mind and the desire to learn.

The introduction of the transistor has made additional study necessary if technicians are to keep abreast of new developments. This guide presents a simple and logical explanation of transistors, how they work, and how to service transistorized and all-transistor equipment. By following definite and straight forward procedures, the reader will be able to save himself much servicing time. And, in the servicing business, time saved is money earned.

Troubleshooting transistor radios can be quick and simple ... or it can be painful and time consuming--it depends on the method used. The procedures in this guide have been tested on hundreds of radios and taught to thousands of technicians.

In fact, they probably are the most tested principles ever to be published on the subject.

Anyone can change parts! The forte of a real technician is his ability to accurately and rapidly track down a defect.

Diagnosis is everything. Yet this is where many a service technician stubs his toe.

This is a practical guide because it was written from experience ... not from pure theory. Furthermore, experience has shown that technicians (and even many engineers) do not have to know all the complicated theory involved in the inner workings of transistors. Thus, the reader has been spared the boredom of learning about tracking holes and electrons.

Following the simple explanation of how transistors work, and the information on the best methods of testing transistor radios, are actual trouble experiences. Step by step, these experiences lead the reader to a logical solution. By this method, he is given a clear and workable understanding of the subject.

This guide will help you "see the dawn," for it was written for that purpose--to bring the fascinating subject of transistors out into the bright and clear area of real understanding.

My special thanks to Jack Parry of Parry Radio Repair, Anderson, Indiana, for the use of his shop, and the Delco Radio Division of General Motors for their assistance.

-BILL CALDWELL


Also see:

Using Scopes in Transistor Circuits (1968)

Design & Operation of Regulated Power Supplies (1970)

 

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