Direct Readout Meters (1966) -- Contents and Intro

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1--INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL METERS

2--INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL METERS

3--INTRODUCTION TO ANALOG METERS

4--TYPICAL DIGITAL METER CIRCUITS

5--TYPICAL DIFFERENTIAL METER CIRCUITS

6--TYPICAL INTEGRATING DIGITAL-METER CIRCUITS

7--SPECIAL-PURPOSE ANALOG METERS

GLOSSARY



PREFACE:

Today's laboratory technician must master a host of new generation meters. While the conventional vom and vtvm fill the need for most shop technicians and home experimenters, industrial electronic measurements require the precision and convenience offered by digital, differential, and special-purpose analog meters. These new generation meters have been designed to provide the convenience and precision required in industrial electronic measurements today. It therefore behooves the technician to have the information in this guide so as to better qualify himself as a laboratory meter specialist, whether the problem is one of testing, servicing, or simply understanding the equipment.

The text treats the subject of laboratory meters in logical progression from the less sophisticated digital-type meters to the more complex special analog types. This approach helps to develop the complexity of the circuits as the reader becomes more familiar with the terms and gains confidence in the subject. The signal sequence is followed whenever possible through each group of circuits. Each network is preceded by a discussion of the basic circuit considerations or problems.

No attempt has been made to include design data or the mathematical equations associated with design problems, except where absolutely necessary to understand particular circuits. However, typical operating limits are provided for each type of meter described.

This introductory guide is intended to provide a basic background for modern digital, differential, and analog meters. It explains, in straightforward language, what they are, how they operate, and what they can be expected to do.

by JOHN D. LENK


The need for trained industrial technicians is expanding rapidly. Increased knowledge about modern circuitry is necessary to keep abreast with industrial advances. This guide fills that need by providing information and illustrations to enhance the technician's understanding of the subject of digital, differential, and analog meters.

Written to serve a threefold purpose, the text can be used as a textbook for student technicians, a training aid for the experienced technician desiring to enter the industrial field, and a handy reference for those who are already active in the industry. To fulfill these purposes, a wide variety of laboratory meters is explained in basic terms. Full technician-level circuit descriptions are also provided for the most widely used types of meters. Waveforms at various points throughout the circuits are also discussed.

Laboratory meters are covered in logical progression following signal sequence wherever possible from pickup devices, through the processing circuits, to the display functions. Preceding each group of circuits is a discussion of the basic considerations with typical operating limits outlined for each meter. Numerous illustrations are used throughout the text to enhance your understanding of the subject.

Whether the problem is one of testing, servicing, or simply understanding direct readout meters, this guide provides the answers. The necessary information for technicians to qualify as laboratory meter specialists is thoroughly presented in easy-to-understand terms.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

John D. Lenk has been a full-time writer since 1949. His numerous books and technical articles have found wide acceptance. In addition, he is a technical writer for industry. His background includes electronics training in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He has held a First Class Radiotelephone License and an Amateur Radio License since 1939. Other popular Sams books by Mr. Lenk include Servicing With Dip Meters, Servicing UHF TV, Eliminating Engine Interference, and Electronic Corrosion Control for Boats.

HOWARD W. SAMS & CO., INC. THE BOBBS MERRILL COMPANY, INC.


Also see:

Electronic Component Tests & Measurements (1963)

Using Scopes in Transistor Circuits (1968)

 

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